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„Sonic evidence of the modular synthesizers, granular synthesis, and convolution reverbs used and applied during the production of „Sing The Glaoming“ process are audible, though never so excessively they negate the voice-centric essence of the project. Side A’s “Phonaestheme” begins with a single voice thrice intoning ‘ghlei,‘ after which other vocal parts gradually emerge, some spoken and some sung. Just before the two-minute mark, a female voice enters with a figure one might encounter on a Meredith Monk recording, and vocal parts of varying pitches and durations are woven into an endless series of combinations, the result more than a little hypnotic. Development advances organically from one episode to the next, with the brief re-emergence of ‘ghlei‘ followed by the bright dance of a voice intoning ‘glint.‘ Halfway through, the voices take on a supplicating quality reminiscent of Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares. During one sequence, wave-like movements and transitions call to mind the structural design of Music for 18 Musicians, but “Phonaestheme” never sits still long enough to assume a singular structural form.“ („Sing The Gloaming“ is a wonderful album by Prof. Simon Kirby et al, fully glowing, glimmering four stars, and no. 34 of my year’s end list)

This entry was posted on Dienstag, 15. Dezember 2020 and is filed under "Blog". You can follow any responses to this entry with RSS 2.0. You can leave a response here. Pinging is currently not allowed.

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